Saturday, 12 September 2020

Translation of the Relics of Blessed Thaddeus McCarthy


Ireland witnessed a special occasion on September 12 1897 with the translation from Ivrea in Italy to Cork of the relics of the fifteenth-century Bishop, Blessed  Thaddeus (Tadhg) McCarthy (1455-92). This humble and saintly man had been appointed Bishop of Ross but was illegally deprived of his See and died in Italy before he could return, vindicated, to Ireland. An Australian newspaper report gave its Irish expatriate community a flavour of the excitement of the day on which he finally came home four centuries later:
IRELAND.
Blessed Thaddeus McCarthy.
The Catholics of Cork celebrated with great pomp and ceremony the translation of the remains of the Blessed Thaddeus McCarthy, a former Bishop of the diocese of Cork, who flourished in the latter part of the fifteenth century, and was beatified by the Church twelve months ago. The remains have been resting for four centuries in the Cathedral of Ivrea in Italy, but now they are deposited beneath the altar of St. Mary's Cathedral, Cork. A procession consisting of the clergy representing the the various dioceses, with their Bishops in full canonical vestments accompanied the remains, which were enshrined in a golden sarcophagus, and borne on the shoulders of four canons through the streets to the cathedral. The route was lined by members of the various religious confraternities and was decorated with triumphal arches and banners. High Mass was celebrated, and in the evening there was a display of fireworks from the Cathedral Tower, while illuminations were displayed on a large scale throughout the city.
 W.A. Record (Perth, WA: 1888 - 1922), Saturday 30 October 1897, page 6

 Here at home the occasion was commemorated by a poem from Alice Esmonde in The Irish Monthly. Alice Esmonde was the pseudonym of Tipperary woman Margaret Mary Ryan, a regular contributor of verse to this magazine. Here she contrasts the sad circumstances under which Blessed Thaddeus left his homeland centuries earlier with the warm welcome which greeted his return:

BLESSED THADDEUS MAC CARTHY * 

From the sunshine and the rain
Of the exiled centuries,
From the blue Italian seas,
You have come to us again:
Home to us and dear old Ireland,
To the Land of Saints, your sireland,
And to-morrow and to-morrow,
By the Lee that saw your sorrow
And your pain,

You will rest with sheaf and crown,
Home amongst us evermore,
Fair you found the Irish shore,
When September fields were brown —
You had anguish ere you left us,
For dissensions tore and reft us;
Now the city runs to meet you,
And your kith and kin to greet you
With renown.

You have won the victor's goal,
Kept your heart from earthly taint,
my Father, my Saint!—
Spotless, stainless, kept your soul.
How the bells ring out your glory
How the people tell the story,
As your ashes home they're bringing,
While the music and the singing
Proudly roll!

To God's Heaven when we pray,
You are there of our own kin;
Every Irish heart within,
There's a place for you alway.
How the people's hearts are swelling,
As with tears of love they're telling
Of your life so sad and holy.
Of the patience sweet and lowly
Of your day. 

Oh, the honours God pours down
On His victor in the strife!
Oh, the beauty of your life,
Oh, the glory of your crown!
Far away in glen and valley,
By the hill-side and the alley,
Tears of joy for you are stealing,
In the cabins where they're kneeling,
And the town.

Since you went in grief away,
Slow and slow the ages flow,
Full four hundred years ago —
Looking back seems yesterday —
Since on lonely deathbed lying
Far from home and Ireland dying,
In the still October even,
Angels bore your soul to Heaven,
Now we pray,

One dear hour to see your face.
Our sweet exile, our own Saint!
You whose lips made no complaint.
High of blood and brave of race.
Welcome, welcome home to Ireland,
To the Land of Saints, your sireland,
And we thank the Lord who crowned you,
For the glories that surround you.
For His grace.

Alice Esmonde

* Blessed Thaddeus, Bishop of Cork and Cloyne, died at Ivrea in Piedmont in 1492. His relics, which were kept there ever since with great reverence and with that fame of miracles, were deposited with joyful solemnity in the Cathedral of Cork, September 12th, 1897.

The Irish Monthly, Volume 25 (1897), 596-7.

The memory of this wonderful man, who so richly deserves to complete the path to official recognition of his sanctity, is cherished and upheld by the Blessed Thaddeus MacCarthy's Catholic Heritage Association. At their blog you can see pictures of the beautiful reliquary of Blessed Thaddeus in the Cathedral where he now rests.

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Wednesday, 2 September 2020

Irish Saints' Names - September

Another selection of Irish saints' names as suggestions for Christian names for children, part of the series syndicated by the Australian press in 1914. This is the list of those saints whose feasts fall in the month of September. Usually we have a few female names but this time all are male: 




IRISH SAINTS' NAMES

There are many who think that the Irish saints are only a few, and so their choice of names for their children is very small. Week by week, a list will be given. The name will be spelt as in Irish and the English equivalent will be given in brackets. The sex is marked m. for males, and f. for females. Only one name is given for each day, but more could be given. Year of death as below.

SEPTEMBER.

1. Sceallan (Scallan), m., Armagh.
2. Senan (Senanus), m., Laraghbrien, Kildare.
3. Aengus Mac Nisse (Aengus), bp., Connor, 506
4. Ultan (Ultan), m., Ardbraccan, 657.
5. Ciaran (Kieran), m., Clonmacnois, 549.
6. Cionnoit (Kenneth), bp., Lusk, 497.
7. Siollan. (Siollan), m.
8. Maolcoisne (Melcosny).
9. Maolatgen (Melathgen), m., Armagh, 890.
10. Segen Ua Cuinn (Segenius or Shane), m., Bangor, 663.
11. Conmael (Conmel), m., Oriel, 710.
12. Ailbe (Elvi), bp., Emly, 512.
13. Dagan (Dagan), m., Ehereilly, Wicklow, 640.
14. Caeman (Caeman), m., Russagh, Westmeath. 615.
15. Ainmire (Ainmire), m., Clonfad.
16. Teacan (Tegan), m., Ossory.
17. Rodan (Rodan), m., in France, 680.
18. Enan (Enan), m., Emlaghfad, Sligo, 540.
19. Fiontan (Fintan), m.
20. Aedan (Aedan), m.
21. Saran (Saran) m., Slieve, Gallion, 742. '
22. Ailoll (Elill or Erill), m., Angouleme, France, 876.
23. Adamnan (Adamnan or Eunan), m., Raphoe and Iona.
24. Ceallacan. (Callaghan), m., Clontibret, Monaghan.
25. Loean (Loehan), m., Cloyne, 623.
26. Colman Elo (Colmanelo), m., Lynally, Antrim, 610.
27. Finnian (Finnan), m., at Inis Conula.
28. Diarmaid (Dermot), m., Feenagh, Leitrim.
29. Nessan (Xessan), m., Ulster.
30. Conna (Conna), m., Clonard, 714.

Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), Friday 11 September 1914, page 6


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Monday, 3 August 2020

Irish Saints' Names - August

Another selection from 1914 of Irish saints, this time of those whose feasts fall in the month of August, offered as suggestions for naming children:

IRISH SAINTS' NAMES.
There are many who think that the Irish saints are only a few, and so their choice of names for their children is very small. Week by week, a list will be given. The name will be spelt as in Irish and the English equivalent will be given in brackets. The sex is marked m. for males, and f. for females. Only one name is given for each day, but more could be given. Year of death as below.

AUGUST.
1. Saran (Saran) m., Bangor, 742.
2. Comgan (Comgan) m.
3. Trea (Trea) f., Ardtrea.
4. Molua (Molua) m. Slieve Bloom and Killaloe, 623.
5. Moliba (Moliba) m., at Gort Cirbe.
6. Mocua (Mochua) m., Olondalkin, 631.
7. Cronan (Cronan), m., Moville, 650.
8. Daire (Dera), f.
9. Nati (Nahi), m., Leyney, Sligo, 618.
10. Cuimin (Cumman), m., Drumbre.
11. Donnan (Donnan), brother of St. Kevin.
12. Molaisse (Molaise), m., Inishmurray.
13. Eimear (Ivor), bp., Armagh, 1134.
14. Fachtnan (Fachtna), m., Ross, 588.
15. Aedh MacCarten (Aedh), m., Clogher.
16. Lugan (Luan), m.
17. Teimnen (Teinen), m., Annagaesan, Louth.
18. Ernin (Ernan), m., Rathnen, 635.
19 Mocta (Mochta), bp., Louth, 535,
20. Lasair (Lasara), f., in Co. Meath.
21. Sionac (Senach), m., Clonard, 588.
22. Aindrias (Andrew), brother of St. Donatus, Fiesole, Italy.
23. Ergan (Euginius or Owen), bp., Ardstraw, 618.
24. Rodan (Rodan), m., Murrisk.
25. Michen (Michan), m., Dublin.
26. Farlan (Farlan), m., Fartullagh,Westmeath.
27. Usaille (Auxilius), bp., Kilossy.
28. Fulimid (Felimy), King of Munster.
29. Vindic (Finnan), m., Tynan, Armagh.
30 Fiuria (Fiuchra or Fiacre), Meaux, France, 650.
31. Aedan (Aidan), Lindisfarne, England,

 Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), Friday 7 August 1914, page 8
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Friday, 17 July 2020

Saint Golgus (Colgus of Iona), July 17

Some of the problems faced by hagiologists in their study of the saints are illustrated by Article VIII for July 17 in Volume VII of Canon O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints. He suggests that in the supposed feast on this day of an Abbot Golgus, we may be dealing with a case of mistaken identity. The error has been made by the seventeenth-century Scottish calendarist David Camerarius:
Reputed Feast of St. Golgus, Abbot.
At the present date, David Camerarius mentions a Golgus, Abbot, said to be alluded to by Adamnan, in his Third Book—assumed to be in his work Vita S. Columbae—and by other writers. While the Bollandists insert this reputed feast, on his authority, they remark, that under such form, they could not find his name, and therefore, they defer classing Golgus, Abbot, among the saints, until strengthened by further authority than that of Camerarius.
So, this raises the possibility that behind 'Golgus' lies a member of the Iona monastic community, Colgus.  Indeed, although he does not say so here, in the Introduction to Volume I of his magnum opus Canon O'Hanlon wrote that a 'St. Colgius or Colchuo, is said to have been author of a Treatise on the Miracles of his Master, St. Columkille'.

A footnote states plainly that
 In Dempster's "Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Scotorum," tomus i., lib. vii., num. 578, he is called "St. Golgus."
Thus it seems that Canon O'Hanlon had already concluded that Golgus is probably a misspelling of Colgus (Colgius), a Latinization of the Irish name Colga. He reiterates this conclusion in the final footnote to his article on the mysterious Saint Golgus:
Probably Camerarius meant to have written Colgius, who is mentioned by Adamnan, in lib iii., cap.20, but whose festival - if one he had - is not known.
Here is an account of Colga of Iona and one of the miracles of its founding saint to which was a witness from the classic translation of Bishop William Reeves:

CHAPTER XXI.
Of another very similar Vision of great brilliancy.

ANOTHER night also, one of the brothers, whose name was Colga, the son of Aid Draigniche, of the grandsons of Fechrech mentioned in the first Book, came by chance, while the other brothers were asleep, to the gate of the church, and stood there for some time praying. Then suddenly he saw the whole church filled with a heavenly light, which more quickly than he could tell, flashed like lightning from his gaze. He did not know that St. Columba was praying at that time in the church, and after this sudden appearance of light, he returned home in great alarm. On the following day the saint called him aside and rebuked him severely, saying: "Take care of one thing, my child, that you do not attempt to spy out and pry too closely into the nature of that heavenly light which was not granted thee, but rather fled from thee, and that thou do not tell any one during my lifetime what thou hast seen."

Life of Saint Columba, founder of Hy. Written by Adamnan. Edited by William Reeves (Edinburgh 1874), 92.
 
Knowledge of Colga of Iona seems to be confined to this source and I have not been able to find another recorded feast day for him. Ó Riain's A Dictionary of Irish Saints does not mention this saint in connection with the Golgus recorded on the Scottish calendars at July 17 but suggests that he may be identical with Saint Colga of Kilcolgan, County Galway.

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Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Irish Saints' Names - July

Another selection of Irish saints' names as  suggested to readers of the Southern Cross in Adelaide, Australia in 1914. This selection relates to saints whose feasts occur in July and the more obscure among them are well represented.

IRISH SAINTS' NAMES.
There are many who think that the Irish saints are only a few, and so their choice of names for their children is very small. Week by week, a list will be given. The name will be spelt as in Irish and the English equivalent will be given in brackets. The sex is marked m. for males, and f. for females. Only one name is given for each day, but more could be given. Year of death as below.

JULY

1. Ailioll (Elill or Erill), nr., Armagh, 536.
2. Ternoc. or Mernoc (Ernan. or Marnoc),m.
3. Maolmuire (Myles, or Melmary), m.,12th century.
4. Finnbarr (Finnbarr), m., Little Island, Waterford, 657.
5. Etaoin (Aideen, Edeana, or Moduena),f., Moylurg, Connacht.
6. Eitne (Eithne, Enny), f.
7. Maolruian (Melruan), m.. Tallaght, 792.
8. Cillin (Killian), m., Wurtzburg, Germany, 689.
9. Garban (Garvan), m., Kinsale.
10. Cuan (Cuan), m., Wexford, 8th century.
11. Failbe (Falvy), m., Westmeath.
12. Ultan (Ultan), m.
13. Greallan (Grellan), m., Tallaght.
14. Maeldegar (Maldegar), m., 677.
15. Ronan (Ronan), m.
16. Maolodran (Meloran), m., Brimult, King's Co.
17. Craohnat (Craevnata), f.
18. Mianac (Mianach), f.
19. Feargus (Fergus), m.
20. Cuirbin (Cuirbhin), m.
21. Curcac (Corca), f.
22. Buadan (Bodan), m., Culdaff.
23. Banbnat (Banavnat), f.
24. Blatmac (Blathmac), m., Iona, 824, feast also on 19 January.
25. Neassan (Nessan), m., Mungrit, 552.
26. Toman (Toman), m., Mungret.
27. Guiare (Guiare), m.
28. Furodran (Furoran), m.
29. Gailan (Caelan), m., Scattery Island.
30. Mooltuile (Miltille), m., Dysart, Westmeath.
31. Naal (Natalis, Nael), m., Kilnamanagh, Kilkenny, 564.

 Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), Friday 10 July 1914, page 8

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Saturday, 20 June 2020

New Blog on the Irish Martyrs

Today, the Feast of the Irish Martyrs, I am launching De Processu Martyriali, a new blog dedicated to all those who gave their lives for the Catholic faith in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. I will be taking the same approach as I do here and hope to bring a mixture of classic accounts and insights from  modern scholarship. I am particularly interested in uncovering the stories of the less well-known martyrs. The new blog takes its name from a catalogue of Irish Martyrs by David Rothe, Bishop of Ossory (1573-1650) and you can visit it here.

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Monday, 1 June 2020

Irish Saints' Names - June

A selection of suggestions for naming children, this time for the month of June. Note that at June 2, Saint Colman is associated with Kilchief in Down, that is a typo for Kilclief. I am impressed by the number of lesser-known saints whose names feature in these monthly lists, but not surprisingly the most famous saint whose feast falls in this month, Colum Cille, hasn't been overlooked.

Irish Saints' Names.

There are many who think that the Irish saints are only a few, and so their choice of names for their children is very small. Week by week, a list will be given. The name will be spelt as in Irish and the English equivalent will be given in brackets. The sex is marked m. for males, and f. for females. Only one name is given for each day, but more could be given. Year of death as below.

JUNE.

1. Cuimin (Cummian), m., Rathlin.
2. Colman (Colman), m., Kilchief, Down.
3. Caoimgen (Kevin), m., Glendalough, 618.
4. Faitlen (Fallan), m.
5. Findlug (Finlu), m.
6. Iarlait (Jarlath), m.. also on December 26.
7. Colman (Colman), m., Dromore, 515.
8. Luaitren (Luarena), f., feast also on May 1.
9. Colm-cille (Colmcille), patron of Ireland, born at Gartan, Donegal, on December 7, 521, died at Iona, 597.
10. Iolladan (Iollan), m., Fircall, 6th century.
11. Aengus, or Eogan Maccail (Aengus), bp. Kilcullen, 549.
12. Giolla Criost, or Criostan (Gilchrist), brother of St. Malachy.
13. Caireall (Carrol), m., Ballyhale.
14. Ciaran (Kieran), in., Castlekieran, Kells, 770.
15. Sineall (Sineall), m.
16. Setna (Setna), m.
17. Moling (Moling, or Mullen), bp. Ferns, 697.
18. Furodran (Furoran), m.
19. Caslan (Caelan), m.
20. Faelan (Faelan), m., Kilcolumbane, Queen's Co.
21. Cormac (Cormac), m., Barrymore.
22. Cronan (Cronan), m., Ferns.
23. Mocaoi (Mohee), m., Mahee Island, Down, 496.
24. Romoel (Rumold), m., Malines, Belgium, 775.
25. Lugaid (Lewy), m., 589.
26. Soadbar (Soadbar), m., Inishnag, Thomastown, 889.
27. Dioman (Diman), m.
28. Cruimine (Crumeen, or Crumian), m., Lecan, Westmeath.
29. Faoldobair (Feldore), m.. Clogher, 702.
30. Failbe (Falvy), m., at Cell Eo., in Connacht.

Irish Saints' Names. (1914, June 5). Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), p. 18. Retrieved May 31, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article167793520

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